Feds Lay Down Social Media Rules

From time to time GovEvents will come across information we feel our members and audience would benefit from. Here's something we wanted to share:

Originally posted on Computerworld.com

The U.S. government is making it clear to federal employees what they can and cannot post or tweet about on their favorite social networks.

It's an idea that enterprises should note and use to put their own guidelines in place, according to industry analysts.

The U.S. Office of Government Ethics released the guidelines, dubbed Standards of Conduct and Social Media, last week. The rules cover not using social media during work time and on government property, as well as not using their official title, using social media to look for another job and not disclosing "non-public information" to further private interests. Continue reading

Phased Retirement is Finally Here

From time to time GovEvents will come across information we feel our members and audience would benefit from. Here's something we wanted to share:

Originally posted on GovExec.com

After more than two years in federal regulation limbo, the law allowing federal employees to partially retire while continuing to work part-time for the government is finally being implemented.

Eligible federal employees can submit their applications for phased retirement beginning Nov. 6. The Office of Personnel Management on Thursday filed theá129-page final ruleáon the new program for publication in theáFederal Registeráon Friday. The so-called phased retirement provision, included in the 2012 transportation reauthorization act, allows eligible feds to work 20 hours per week, receiving half their pay as well as half their retirement annuity. Those employees who enter phased retirement must devote at least 20 percent of their work time, or about 8 hours a pay period, to mentoring other employees, ideally for those who take over for them when they fully retire.

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Federal scientists crying foul over DATA Act’s conference restrictions

A group of federal scientists is concerned that proposed restrictions on federal employees attending conferences could put scientific research behind the curve.

The Assembly of Scientistsáwroteáto the two top senators on the Homeland Security and Government Affairs Committee last week, arguing that theáDigital Accountability and Transparency (DATA) Actáwould likely lead to a "decline in the productivity, creativity, morale, recruitment and retention" of many of the government's top scientists.

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