Government Event Market Remains Consistent

Last month we surveyed GovEvents' organizer members to get a pulse on what they are seeing in the government events' market. The common theme we found is that the environment for government events seems to be stable and unchanging.

This is good news in the wake of the GSA event scandal that dealt a big hit to the government events' market in 2012 and 2013, but should we get comfortable with this status quo? First, let's look at some of the stats:

These findings were similar to those discovered by Market Connections earlier this year. In that survey of government employees, the results showed that event attendance continued to be flat for the last couple of years after seeing an uptick after the issues around the GSA event were addressed. Continue reading

The Secret is in the Cloud

Amazon Web Services (AWS) recently announced a newly developed "secret region" in their cloud, specifically made to host federal data up to the secret level of security classification--the second-highest level behind top secret. Amazon had previously offered only a top secret region, but this new offering now allows for any sensitive data to be stored in the commercial cloud. According to Amazon, "The U.S. Intelligence Community can now execute their missions with a common set of tools, a constant flow of the latest technology and the flexibility to rapidly scale with the mission." Microsoft Azure also has a similar offering.

The government's adoption of cloud technology started with administrative and low-risk data and applications - service workflow solutions with Salesforce, email platforms, and video conferencing. As evidenced by the work put into securing the cloud for sensitive data, commercial cloud providers see a need and profitable revenue stream with government customers. Continue reading

19 Actionable Steps to Protect Online Privacy – Part 2 of 4

From time to time GovEvents will come across information we feel our members and audience would benefit from. Here's something we wanted to share:

what a VPN does for your online privacy

Online privacy is a topic that grows in importance every single year. With more and more web services, connected apps, and even home assistant devices that are gaining in popularity, it's now more crucial than ever to understand what the dangers to your online privacy are and how to protect it consciously.

This online privacy guide is all about that.

Here are 19 actionable steps to help you remain anonymous on the web and protect your online privacy. No sophisticated computer knowledge required. Continue reading

Getting a Jump on Resolutions: Update the General Session

As we approach the end of 2017, we're already in a contemplative mood for the year ahead. While the event world has been changed by the use of social media, accessibility of video technology, and (for the government market) the constant uncertainty of budgets, the one thing that seems to have remained static is the general session/keynote. Most events still open with a keynote speaker or even a panel. Some work in a video of some sort, but for the most part, general sessions are still one-way, lecture-type presentations.

While there is comfort in the familiarity of this routine, we'd like to challenge event planners to be more innovative in the new year. We've gathered some thoughts on how to change up theĀ general session routine, ensuring attendees walk away not only with more information but also with more energy. Continue reading

19 Actionable Steps to Protect Online Privacy – Part 1 of 4

From time to time GovEvents will come across information we feel our members and audience would benefit from. Here's something we wanted to share:

Online privacy is a topic that grows in importance every single year. With more and more web services, connected apps, and even home assistant devices that are gaining in popularity, this online privacy guide is all about that.

Here are the first of 19 actionable steps to help you remain anonymous on the web and protect your online privacy.

No sophisticated computer knowledge required.

1. Use the privacy/incognito mode

All current versions of web browsers like Chrome, Firefox, Opera come with a privacy mode.

For example, in Chrome, if you press CMD+SHIFT+N (Mac) or CTRL+SHIFT+N (Win), you will open a new tab in privacy mode. In that mode, the browser doesn't store any data at all from the current session. This means no web history, no web cache, no cookies, nothing at all.

Use this mode whenever doing anything that you'd prefer remain private and not able to be retrieved at a later date on the device that you're using.

However! Let's make it clear that privacy modes don't make the connection more secure in any way. They just make it private in relation to your own device - meaning, they make it private on your end only.

(Privacy modes are also available in mobile browsers.) Continue reading